Museum Folkwang
Landschaft bei Pichelswerder
  • Karl Friedrich Schinkel
  • Landschaft bei Pichelswerder, 1814

  • Landscape near Pichelswerder
  • Oil on canvas
  • 62,3 x 96,2 cm
  • Acquired in 1941 with the support of the Folkwang-Museumsverein and the City of Essen
  • Inv. G 167
  • CommentaryKarl Friedrich Schinkel was more than just a draftsman and architect; as a painter, he counts among the Neoclassicists and early Romantics. This is apparent from the character of the paintings he produced after his first visit to Italy in 1803–05, many of which have a utopian or, at any rate, an idealized work of architecture or a cityscape at their center. Even if his ›Landschaft bei Pichelswerder‹ (Landscape near Pichelswerder) emerged from the sight of a real landscape and really does show the view from Pichelswerder looking towards the skyline of Spandau and the distinctive silhouettes of the churches of St. John and St. Nicholas, and the Julius Tower of the Citadel, Schinkel’s perspective from an elevated vantage point, from which the landscape seems to unfold ad infinitum, is deeply romantic. A row of dark evergreens blocks our view of the valley immediately below. Looking beyond the tree tops, however, we see a wide plain with the meandering River Havel—a view that all but eclipses the two figures in the left foreground. Figures viewed from behind and unendingly expansive landscapes are tropes that recall Caspar David Friedrich and that require the careful and acute observation of nature. In Schinkel’s case, however, this kind of scrutiny does not result in a naturalistic depiction of the landscape, no matter how accurate the topography. His aim was rather to capture the reality of the landscape—not to generate any deep, symbolic meanings such as are familiar to us from Friedrich’s landscape »constructs«.
  • Provenance(1938), Herr von Kühlmann, Berlin
    1941, Galerie Hans Bammann, Düsseldorf; Johannes Hinrichsen, Berlin
    1941, Kauf durch die Krupp-Jubiläumsstiftung, Folkwang-Etat, Museum Folkwang, Essen
  • Obj_Id: 3,194
  • Obj_Internet_S: Highlight
  • Obj_Ownership_S (Verantw):Painting, Sculpture, Media Art
  • Obj_SpareNField01_N (Verantw): 187
  • Obj_Creditline_S: Gemäldesammlung
  • Obj_Title1_S: Landschaft bei Pichelswerder
  • Obj_Title2_S: Landscape near Pichelswerder
  • Obj_PartDescription_S (Titelerg):
  • Obj_SpareMField01_M (Alle Titel): Landschaft bei Pichelswerder Landscape near Pichelswerder Landschaft bei Pichelswerder
  • Obj_Dating_S: 1814
  • Jahr von: 1,814
  • Jahr bis: 1,814
  • Obj_IdentNr_S: G 167
  • Obj_IdentNrSort_S: G 0167
  • Obj_Classification_S (Objtyp): Painting
  • Obj_Crate_S: 62,3 x 96,2 cm
  • Obj_Material_S: Oil on canvas
  • Obj_Technique_S:
  • Obj_SpareSField01_S (Mat./Tech.): Oil on canvas
  • Obj_AccNote_S (Erwerb): Acquired in 1941 with the support of the Folkwang-Museumsverein and the City of Essen
  • Obj_PermanentLocation_S (Standort): Internal Exhibition: E 001, Altbau, Sammlung 19. und 20. Jahrhundert
  • Obj_Condition1_S (Druckerei):
  • Obj_Condition2_S (Auflage):
  • Obj_Subtype_S (Genre):
  • Obj_Rights_S: © Museum Folkwang, Essen
Commentary
Artists
Provenance

Karl Friedrich Schinkel was more than just a draftsman and architect; as a painter, he counts among the Neoclassicists and early Romantics. This is apparent from the character of the paintings he produced after his first visit to Italy in 1803–05, many of which have a utopian or, at any rate, an idealized work of architecture or a cityscape at their center. Even if his ›Landschaft bei Pichelswerder‹ (Landscape near Pichelswerder) emerged from the sight of a real landscape and really does show the view from Pichelswerder looking towards the skyline of Spandau and the distinctive silhouettes of the churches of St. John and St. Nicholas, and the Julius Tower of the Citadel, Schinkel’s perspective from an elevated vantage point, from which the landscape seems to unfold ad infinitum, is deeply romantic. A row of dark evergreens blocks our view of the valley immediately below. Looking beyond the tree tops, however, we see a wide plain with the meandering River Havel—a view that all but eclipses the two figures in the left foreground. Figures viewed from behind and unendingly expansive landscapes are tropes that recall Caspar David Friedrich and that require the careful and acute observation of nature. In Schinkel’s case, however, this kind of scrutiny does not result in a naturalistic depiction of the landscape, no matter how accurate the topography. His aim was rather to capture the reality of the landscape—not to generate any deep, symbolic meanings such as are familiar to us from Friedrich’s landscape »constructs«.