Museum Folkwang
Orient-Express
  • Rafael de Ochoa y Madrazo
  • Orient-Express, 1891

  • 120 x 86 cm
  • Printing Press Imprimerie F. Champenois, Paris
  • Permanent loan of the collection Reisen in Luxus, Essen
  • Inv. DPM DL 334
  • CommentaryThe Orient Express was the world’s first luxury train, travelling regularly between Paris and Constantinople from 1883. Such posters were used for the long routes and the various stops. An area in the lower right of the poster was designed to be printed with the information necessary for a specific place. The poster therefore exists in various languages and with different texts. The lavishly designed and printed blank poster (without printed text) was used for many years.

    The poster shows a view of Constantinople, over the Blue Mosque to the Golden Horn, as well as two veiled women. Exotic and secretive foreignness was already in that day a tempting element for distant destinations. Even the depiction of the Karlplatz in Vienna (to the left) is given an exotic accent in the same manner. »The view of Vienna is especially interesting because the Karlsplatz is shown without the shoring of the Vienna river and with the Elisabeth bridge, which no longer exists today. The figures on the bridge, also depicted in the poster, have been preserved and are today found on the Rathausplatz.

    Furthermore, the poster offers a comparison, interesting from the point of view of history of architecture, between the church and the mosque, which was, of course, originally a church. This comparison shows how similar the two buildings are basically, with cupola, minarets and columns. What the graphic artist instinctively noticed in 1891 was provided scholarly proof by the Viennese art historian Claudius Caravias much later in his book ›Mosques along the Vienna‹ from 2008. He showed that the architect Johann Bernhard Fischer von Erlach, for ideological reasons, deliberately included optical references to Rome and Constantinople in designing the Karlskirche.
  • Obj_Id: 35,441
  • Obj_Internet_S: ja
  • Obj_Ownership_S (Verantw):German Poster Museum
  • Obj_SpareNField01_N (Verantw): 242
  • Obj_Creditline_S:
  • Obj_Title1_S: Orient-Express
  • Obj_Title2_S:
  • Obj_PartDescription_S (Titelerg):
  • Obj_SpareMField01_M (Alle Titel): Orient-Express Orient-Express Türkei, Konstantinopel
  • Obj_Dating_S: 1891
  • Jahr von: 1,891
  • Jahr bis: 1,891
  • Obj_IdentNr_S: DPM DL 334
  • Obj_IdentNrSort_S: DPM DL 334
  • Obj_Classification_S (Objtyp): Poster
  • Obj_Crate_S: 120 x 86 cm
  • Obj_Material_S:
  • Obj_Technique_S:
  • Obj_SpareSField01_S (Mat./Tech.):
  • Obj_AccNote_S (Erwerb): Permanent loan of the collection Reisen in Luxus, Essen
  • Obj_PermanentLocation_S (Standort):
  • Obj_Condition1_S (Druckerei): Imprimerie F. Champenois, Paris
  • Obj_Condition2_S (Auflage):
  • Obj_Subtype_S (Genre):
  • Obj_Rights_S: © Museum Folkwang, Essen
Commentary
Artists

The Orient Express was the world’s first luxury train, travelling regularly between Paris and Constantinople from 1883. Such posters were used for the long routes and the various stops. An area in the lower right of the poster was designed to be printed with the information necessary for a specific place. The poster therefore exists in various languages and with different texts. The lavishly designed and printed blank poster (without printed text) was used for many years.

The poster shows a view of Constantinople, over the Blue Mosque to the Golden Horn, as well as two veiled women. Exotic and secretive foreignness was already in that day a tempting element for distant destinations. Even the depiction of the Karlplatz in Vienna (to the left) is given an exotic accent in the same manner. »The view of Vienna is especially interesting because the Karlsplatz is shown without the shoring of the Vienna river and with the Elisabeth bridge, which no longer exists today. The figures on the bridge, also depicted in the poster, have been preserved and are today found on the Rathausplatz.

Furthermore, the poster offers a comparison, interesting from the point of view of history of architecture, between the church and the mosque, which was, of course, originally a church. This comparison shows how similar the two buildings are basically, with cupola, minarets and columns. What the graphic artist instinctively noticed in 1891 was provided scholarly proof by the Viennese art historian Claudius Caravias much later in his book ›Mosques along the Vienna‹ from 2008. He showed that the architect Johann Bernhard Fischer von Erlach, for ideological reasons, deliberately included optical references to Rome and Constantinople in designing the Karlskirche.